Dorset’s Archaeology in 250 Words: Dorchester’s Neolithic Flagstones Enclosure under Thomas Hardy’s house

With the remaining section hidden under the grounds of Thomas Hardy’s house, Max Gate (in Dorchester), the Flagstones interrupted ditch enclosure is a little known site from Neolithic Dorset. The site was partially excavated in 1987-8 prior to works on … Continue reading Dorset’s Archaeology in 250 Words: Dorchester’s Neolithic Flagstones Enclosure under Thomas Hardy’s house

Dorset’s Archaeology in 150 Words #10: The Iron Age Trading Site of Hengistbury Head

Around 700BC, a settlement was established at Hengistbury Head; a headland dominating the southern side of Christchurch Harbour. The Double Dykes, a pair of banks and ditches, were constructed to provide defence to the settlement. Through excavations and investigations on … Continue reading Dorset’s Archaeology in 150 Words #10: The Iron Age Trading Site of Hengistbury Head

Dorset’s Archaeology in 250 Words #9: Wheeler’s ‘War Cemetery’ at Maiden Castle

In what has become one of the most famous excavations in British Archaeology, Sir Mortimer Wheeler spent four summers between 1934 and 1937 excavating at Maiden Castle, near Dorchester, Dorset. Wheeler uncovered a late Iron Age cemetery of more than … Continue reading Dorset’s Archaeology in 250 Words #9: Wheeler’s ‘War Cemetery’ at Maiden Castle